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Evidence based medicine doesn’t protect patients – it just prevents them getting unpatentable treatments

8 by / on 8 Jan 2016, / in cancer, evidence based medicine

Leafing through the New Year papers I was struck by the similarity between the housing crisis the diabetes and obesity epidemics. In one case rapidly inflating prices pushing virtually all properties out of reach of anyone on an average wage, in the other a relentless expansion of supermarket shelving devoted to refined carbohydrates, driving an inexorable inflation of the nation’s waistlines.

The dietitians’ blowback against low carbs continues. Evidence in favour keeps mounting

8 by / on 1 Dec 2015, / in low carb diet

There is a feature of mine in the Daily Mail today which deals with recent research showing the rapid benefit a high fat low carb diet can have on a dangerous disorder known as NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). You’ve probably heard about fatty liver disease in connection with drinking too much. This version looks like being the result of eating too much carbohydrate.

Why heart doctors will soon get fooled again

5 by / on 17 Nov 2015, / in statins

That old adage ‘Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me’ looks like a perfect description of why the heart disease establishment should be hanging its collective head. Having totally bought into one cholesterol-lowering class of drug – statins – it now looks ready to open its arms and pockets equally wide to embrace a new improved more powerful son of statin drug – the PCSK9 inhibitors – that will drive that deadly fatty stuff right to the floor.

The doctor who came to stay. Treating chronic disease by tackling the cause

5 by / on 17 Nov 2015, / in low carb diet

Given this blog’s commitment to tackling chromic disease by helping people change their lifestyle, I was delighted to discover that the BBC 1 was devoting its prime time 9.00 slot to a three part series about passionate young GP, Dr Rangan Chatterjee, who goes to stay with patients and turns their unhealthy lifestyle around.

The sugar tax: a beacon of hope for tackling chronic disease

7 by / on 3 Nov 2015, / in low carb diet

The sugar tax is obviously a very sensible idea but it’s much more than that. It’s prophetic, it’s a sign of a major change, it’s the swallow that could be heralding a medical summer. The tax is shorthand for a long running battle around what is a healthy diet, which turns out to be about a lot more than just diet.

Utopia: A realistic blueprint for an honest drug industry

4 by / on 20 Oct 2015, / in evidence based medicine

Generally we don’t trust utopias. If they don’t remain fantasies but emerge into the real world, we expect them either to rapidly descent into rigid authoritarian hells or to disintegrate into factions and unproductive chaos.

The Cancer Whisperer: How to broker a peace deal in the war on cancer

5 by / on 8 Oct 2015, / in cancer

Just over a year ago Sophie Sabbage was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She was a 48-years-old experienced personal development trainer, married with a young daughter. Her doctors agreed she didn’t have long to live but this week the book she only began writing just over a month ago, is being published.

Time For Diabetes UK To Unplug Ears and Respond To Chorus Of Disapproval Demanding U-Turn

24 by / on 29 Sep 2015, / in evidence based medicine, low carb diet

How much longer can the charity Diabetes UK continue to provide advice on diet to the UK’s 3.9 million people with type 2 diabetes that is based on the discredited Seven Countries Study carried out by Ancel Keys back in the 1940s? The urgency of this question cannot be overstated.

Dose of Jeremy Corbyn needed to make medicines safe

12 by / on 21 Sep 2015, / in evidence based medicine

It’s generally agreed that the NHS is not in good health but there’s no clear diagnosis. There are plenty of suggestions – lack of funding, uncompassionate nurses or box-ticking managers. But I want to suggest another one: the crisis in evidence based medicine (EBM).

Is it really codswallop that fish oil protects the brain? Probably not. Here’s why…

5 by / on 3 Sep 2015, / in dementia

If you aren’t confused about whether taking omega-3 will keep your brain sharp or is simply a waste of money, you haven’t been paying attention. Last week the media carried reports of a new study that found that taking a gram of fish oil a day didn’t protect elderly people from failing memory and poorer thinking skills.

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